DNB: Intentional Confusion, Another Old Rich White Democrat, People Receive Puzzling Text Messages Across The Country. Why?, & Trump Launches Black Voter Initiative In Atlanta (2019.11.08)

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The Propaganda Report Podcast: DNB: Intentional Confusion, Another Old Rich White Democrat, People Receive Puzzling Text Messages Across The Country. Why?, & Trump Launches Black Voter Initiative In Atlanta (2019.11.08)

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3 thoughts on “DNB: Intentional Confusion, Another Old Rich White Democrat, People Receive Puzzling Text Messages Across The Country. Why?, & Trump Launches Black Voter Initiative In Atlanta (2019.11.08)”

  1. I’m thinking that those mystery texts provide the requisite ambiguity for plausible deniability of when a text was sent. Could come in handy at some point. (ex. “Well, before he died he sent me a text that said……but I’m just receiving it now…”)

  2. Great point. Text messages as evidence in court has popped up in the news more and more, specifically in those cases where one person encouraged another to commit suicide. Don’t know that this could impact cases like that, but could definitely see it muddying the waters in other types of cases. Although I’m sure there’s a way it could factor into those suicide cases as well.

  3. Just my opinion—but I have real problems with the concept of being found guilty of driving a person to suicide. Leaving that to the side for a moment, [serious question] I wonder if a strategically-placed “lol” could have gotten these people off?

    The reason it’s a serious question is that when we’re dealing with text messages as evidence (not referring specifically to suicide cases), we have to make certain ASSUMPTIONS about context (as do the actual recipients). Among other aspects, can sarcasm be proved or disproved in a text by a jury of peers without first-hand knowledge of the entire context of the relationship between the sender/recipient? What if part of the conversation was in person which established the context and the texts were somewhat nuanced within that context (unknown to 3rd parties who only read the text exchange)?

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