Coronavirus Fake Threat

Welcome Deep Dives Grab Bag Coronavirus Fake Threat

Tagged: 

  • #29865

    Kathleen King
    Participant

    I am just wondering what could be the reason that this new coronavirus is getting such an extreme reaction? Even if the CDC figures are incorrect regarding the garden varieties of flu and colds (colds are coronaviruses), our garden variety of viruses still kill a large number of people vulnerable to developing pneumonia with a respiratory illness. At latest count the new coronavirus has killed 136 in China. Wuhan alone has a population of around 11 million per reports. While this is terrible for the individuals and their families, there is just something wrong with such an extreme reaction to such a low mortality rate. It just doesn’t make sense to me.

Viewing 5 reply threads
    • #29955

      Eric Blackwood
      Participant

      Event 201 FINANCE IN AN EPIDEMIC

      interesting how they met literally days after Event 201

      World Bank’s IDA Crisis Response Window
      IDA (International Development Association) is the part of the World Bank that gives loans (called “credits”) to poor countries for development. They meet every 3 years to raise money and decide how it will be spent. These are called Replenishment meetings. The last one, the 18th Replenishment, or IDA18, finished in 2016. It raised $75 billion to finance projects from July 1, 2017, to June 30, 2020. The next meeting in this cycle is October 21-22 2019 in Washington DC

      Cost of Supporting Health Systems
      About $6 billion was disbursed by donors in response to the 2014-2016 West Africa Ebola epidemic.10 At the point in the scenario where the $400 billion estimate is made, it is assumed that CAPS would cause case counts and expenses in low- and middle-income countries about 2 orders of magnitude higher than the Ebola epidemic.
      CAPS would, in many cases, cause emergency spending that would quickly consume all of countries’ annual healthcare budgets. They would then need a bailout to continue normal functioning as well as providing minimal pandemic response. Low- and middle-income countries typically spend about 5% of GDP on health care, and in a crisis situation, everything gets more expensive. The total GDP of low- and middle-income countries (excluding China, India, and Russia) is about $14 trillion. If these countries require a bailout of, on average, slightly more than half of their annual healthcare spending. This would be about $400 billion.

       

      Alot of interesting stuff in here. Especially the criteria for emergency financing. I am wondering if (with $1 trillion the IMF has the ability to lend) it is possible this coronavirus is more about a monetary bailout?

       

       

       

       

       

       

      http://www.centerforhealthsecurity.org/event201/event201-resources/finance-fact-sheet-191009.pdf

       

    • #29970

      Kathleen King
      Participant

      Yes. I guess the answer is to follow the money!

    • #30062

      I think that Coronavirus is a real health threat for a lot of people. The disease is apparently highly contagious, and further it has nearly a 2% mortality rate and roughly a 10% hospitalization rate. That may not seem to high as a percentage goes, but it would be crippling if people did nothing. 10% of 320 million people is still 32 million.

      Okay, so despite that, I think that the government is taking and will take advantage of this just as they do any other crisis. Likewise, I don’t find it too far fetched to think that this was known and/or planned, but I do not find it too useful to spend brain cycles on where this started or how. As far as what advantage they are taking however, that is useful.

      Every single right guaranteed by the US Constitution is now gone. The USA is no longer a free nation in any way at all. To the extent that you are able to exercise any freedom is merely because your rulers are somewhat benevolent, but as this event and others have shown, you have no rights.

      I think that the second big thing is cover. COVID-19 has provided the perfect scapegoat at just the right moment for the collapse of the global economic system. This was starting before the crisis with the bond yield inversion and the first tumbles in stocks. The Fed had started subsidizing the overnight repurchase markets, and the Fed had stopped shrinking its balance sheet and started growing it again. With the start of this crisis, we see the Fed printing, the government engaging in massive spending bills with tons of riders. This is … really just sort of fascist/socialist economic planning at this point.

      The third big one, the digital dollar was scrapped from the stimulus at the last minute, but the fact that it made into the bill at all is big. I had long thought cryptos to be a public beta, but I do believe that a government owned/controlled blockchain with zero anonymity will be the next global currency. It’s just to tempting a thing for those who want complete surveillance and control. I suspect that will come before too long. The Keynesian stuff I mentioned previously will make this economic depression so much worse than it ought to be that people will clamor for rescue. The government will have this new currency on standby and roll it out to save everyone. Naturally, all of the economic bills involve cronyism (some outright with bailouts, others through exclusive government contract work).

      Finally, the world culture has become more atomized than ever. Civic society is largely dead. Most people don’t know many neighbors. Private media consumption has become the biggest of hobbies. That was all before COVID-19… with COVID? Man oh man, has this worsened. Telecommuting has spiked, obviously. I imagine that some of these changes will be permanent no matter what government chooses to do. For example, the telecommuting thing had been successful for many companies. There are major companies that have no physical office building, and as many business owners are discovering, people will still be productive and the company will save huge amounts of money. Skyscrapers and other big office buildings are super expensive, but even modest office buildings are expensive. The heating and cooling costs, the water costs from toilets and sinks, the food costs, the property costs, the cleaning services, the lighting, the equipment, etc… it’s way cheaper to do everything virtually. For those who needn’t be physically on-site, from an economic perspective, they ought not. Not only would their presence increase business costs in an immediate sense, there are unseen costs too: spreading of seasonal colds and flu that make people take sick days, people with long commutes tend to work fewer hours and be a little less productive overall, those long commutes also increase staff turn over, a boss people don’t see is a less hated boss which further reduces turn over. The increase in curb side pickup, delivery, and so on I do not expect to ever go away. I also expect that hoarding and saving will increase permanently.

    • #30063

      Monica Perez
      Keymaster

      a major thing people are missing about the digital currency is that there would be AN EXCHANGE RATE with cash & negative interest rates would be unavoidable! https://blogs.imf.org/2019/02/05/cashing-in-how-to-make-negative-interest-rates-work/

    • #30064

      Monica Perez
      Keymaster

      also i think the numbers are bogus…they will probably start massaging some stats they call apples to apples but the only good data has been from iceland and south korea that has totally normal stats as in this is a regular cold flu pneumonia season with old people – people at a high risk of death every flu season – at a high risk of death…we can have a theoretical discussion about what govt should do in a pandemic but the risk of one in the world today is negligible without being fostered from above IMO

    • #30065

      also i think the numbers are bogus…they will probably start massaging some stats they call apples to apples but the only good data has been from iceland and south korea that has totally normal stats as in this is a regular cold flu pneumonia season with old people – people at a high risk of death every flu season – at a high risk of death…we can have a theoretical discussion about what govt should do in a pandemic but the risk of one in the world today is negligible without being fostered from above IMO

      So, absolutely, some of the numbers are bogus, but when we talk about South Korea or Iceland we have to keep in mind what their cultures are not like ours to start with. In South Korea, people regularly wear masks and have them on hand for any cold/flu season (given history with SARS, incredibly dense population centers, and a rather conservative culture that places an emphasis awareness of others). In Iceland there’s a culture of general cleanliness, a small population, and less travel in and out of the country. In both cases, they were already disposed to have a small outbreak. I am not sure that comparisons to/from those countries is all too helpful. While I admit that this disease doesn’t have a particularly high kill rate (it’s not tuberculosis or anything), it’s still a problem that we have a new strain of the common cold that has become deadly, and it’s definitely a problem for people with lung, kidney, or immune problems. While government action is immoral and while knowing that governments are going to take advantage of the problem, having a new way to get dead is, in general, not a good thing.  Just my thoughts on the issue.

Viewing 5 reply threads

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.